Rail Safety Facts

Trains

  • A six carriage train in Perth can weigh up to 90 tonnes.
  • Trains can take up to 800m to stop, longer if they are travelling at the maximum speed of 130km/h or if the tracks are wet from rain, that’s almost 3 x a standard aussie rules football field.
  • Trains are really noisy side on, but front on they are virtually silent. They are metal on metal and powered by electricity. By the time you realise one is coming, you may not have time to get out of the way.
  • Trains can’t swerve to avoid an object or person, because they are on tracks.
  • Trains are powered by 25,000 volts of electricity, over 100 times more power than the power in our homes.
  • Electricity can “arc” which means if you throw something at the overhead wires or get close to them with an object the electricity can jump to that object, ultimately ending up connecting with you. This means instant death.
  • Perth has 188.5kms of double track railway including the new Butler extension.
  • There are 71 stations across the network.
  • A train travelling at 130k/h will travel 10m in less than a second
  • A train travelling at 130k/h will travel 50m in 1.4 seconds
  • It is illegal to go on train tracks unless you are walking across a pedestrian level crossing, or driving across a level crossing. This is called trespass and the penalty is $200, or your life.
  • Pushing through the pedestrian gates after they have closed is trespass.
  • Jumping down on the tracks, even to retrieve an item that has been dropped is considered trespass – instead press the help button at the station and ask for a PTA staff member to come and assist.
  • A pedestrian crossing a level crossing (where cars cross the train tracks) when the boom gates are down is considered trespass.
  • The timetables and screens at train station only notify passengers of the next scheduled service due to stop at that station. It does not display express trains or freight trains. If you think there is time to run across the tracks before the next train is due, there very well may be an express train 3 seconds away which travels at 130km/h.
  • People considering crossing the tracks at an undesignated spot may not have considered the “unknown factors” including the possibility of twisting your ankle on the ballast (rocks) and not being able to move out of the way quickly, or even tripping and knocking your head, getting a foot or item of clothing caught, or catching your bike tyre in the tracks. All these things may result in not being about to move out of the way of an oncoming train.
  • You can’t know what your “Fight or Flight” response will be – some people freeze when they are scared (or impaired by drugs or alcohol). There are no second chances around trains.
  • People considering jumping down from the platform for a shortcut or to retrieve a dropped item may not consider how far it is down to the tracks. People may not have the upper body strength to pull themselves up and out of the way – we see it all the time – strong men who jump down to cross over to the other platform trying to get up on the other side multiple times, each time they are weaker than the previous time and unless there is someone there on the platform to help pull them up, they may not be able to make it and the train is going too fast to stop in time.
  • Even a slow moving train will cause significant damage or death to a human body.
  • Tracks in Perth metro areas are classed as “narrow gauge”, this means there is no way a body can fit between the tracks and have a train roll over them as seen in some you tube clips in other countries. Even in Jonathan Beninca’s case, if it had happened in Perth, he would not have survived as in Sydney they have “wide gauge” tracks so he was able to fit between them.
  • Fighting on Transperth services or PTA property can lead to an arrest by bus security officers or transit officers and can result in a conviction and a fine as high as $36,000 or 10 years in prison.
  • Transperth has over 250 transit officers on the network. They have the same powers to arrest or issue fines as police.
  • There are emergency buttons at every station which are monitored 24 hours by the Central Monitoring Room staff, if you feel unsafe or witness any dangerous behaviour, press the button and help will be sent.
  • On every train carriage and in every train station there are CCTV cameras which are monitored 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
  • The quality of footage in the CCTV cameras is exceptionally good. People can be easily identified. This means even if there is no one at the station witnessing your actions; they can be identified by the staff in the Central Monitoring Room.
  • If you are caught committing a crime on PTA property, you will be charged for EVERY offense you have committed where you are identifiable.

 

Trespass

  • It is illegal to go on train tracks unless you are walking across a pedestrian level crossing, or driving across a level crossing. This is called trespass and the penalty is $200, or your life.
  • Pushing through the pedestrian gates after they have closed is trespass.
  • Jumping down on the tracks, even to retrieve an item that has been dropped is considered trespass – instead press the help button at the station and ask for a PTA staff member to come and assist.
  • A pedestrian crossing a level crossing (where cars cross the train tracks) when the boom gates are down is considered trespass.
  • The timetables and screens at train station only notify passengers of the next scheduled service due to stop at that station. It does not display express trains or freight trains. If you think there is time to run across the tracks before the next train is due, there very well may be an express train 3 seconds away which travels at 130km/h.
  • People considering crossing the tracks at an undesignated spot may not have considered the “unknown factors” including the possibility of twisting your ankle on the ballast (rocks) and not being able to move out of the way quickly, or even tripping and knocking your head, getting a foot or item of clothing caught, or catching your bike tyre in the tracks. All these things may result in not being about to move out of the way of an oncoming train.
  • You can’t know what your “Fight or Flight” response will be – some people freeze when they are scared (or impaired by drugs or alcohol). There are no second chances around trains.
  • People considering jumping down from the platform for a shortcut or to retrieve a dropped item may not consider how far it is down to the tracks. People may not have the upper body strength to pull themselves up and out of the way – we see it all the time – strong men who jump down to cross over to the other platform trying to get up on the other side multiple times, each time they are weaker than the previous time and unless there is someone there on the platform to help pull them up, they may not be able to make it and the train is going too fast to stop in time.
  • Even a slow moving train will cause significant damage or death to a human body.
  • Tracks in Perth metro areas are classed as “narrow gauge”, this means there is no way a body can fit between the tracks and have a train roll over them as seen in some you tube clips in other countries. Even in Jonathan Beninca’s case, if it had happened in Perth, he would not have survived as in Sydney they have “wide gauge” tracks so he was able to fit between them. 

 

Anti-Social Behaviour

  • Fighting on Transperth services or PTA property can lead to an arrest by bus security officers or transit officers and can result in a conviction and a fine as high as $36,000 or 10 years in prison.
  • Transperth has over 250 transit officers on the network. They have the same powers to arrest or issue fines as police.
  • There are emergency buttons at every station which are monitored 24 hours by the Central Monitoring Room staff, if you feel unsafe or witness any dangerous behaviour, press the button and help will be sent.
  • On every train carriage and in every train station there are CCTV cameras which are monitored 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
  • The quality of footage in the CCTV cameras is exceptionally good. People can be easily identified. This means even if there is no one at the station witnessing your actions; they can be identified by the staff in the Central Monitoring Room.
  • If you are caught committing a crime on PTA property, you will be charged for EVERY offense you have committed where you are identifiable.

 

Infringements

  • Not buying the correct ticket will incur an on the spot $100 infringement notice. If you don’t pay it can then be referred to the Fines Enforcement Agency and you may be issued a court order to pay. If you still don’t pay then your driver’s license may be suspended and additional costs may be incurred.
  • Transit Officers have access to the WA Police database and can do an on-the-spot check of your identification. If you refuse or give a false name this is an offense and can get you arrested.
  • The difference between a fine and an infringement is that a fine can only be imposed on you by a court.
  • If you ask to have the infringement considered by a court, you are in effect electing to be prosecuted through court for the offence. This means the offence will be considered by a magistrate. You will be given an opportunity to explain to the magistrate why you think the infringement notice was incorrectly issued and the magistrate will make a decision as to whether you committed the offence or not. If you are found guilty (convicted) of the offence,%2